NLPhilia Blog

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Two new to the blogroll

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After two years of benign neglect of this site, I updated the blogroll. I added two and wanted to draw your attention to them.

Andy Smith’s Practical NLP Podcast is just profoundly good. He explains the fundamentals of NLP in such a way that you can put them to immediate use in your everyday life no matter what your level of training.

Barking Up The Wrong Tree is… difficult to describe. I’ll let you have a look.

Got a favorite blog for NLP, hypnosis, persuasion, or related topics? Let me know in the comments!

Written by Michael DeBusk

June 26th, 2016 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Reading People

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In one of my favorite blogs, Barking Up The Wrong Tree, we find five “how to read people” secrets backed by research:

  • Don’t make the usual mistakes: Take context, clusters, baseline, and biases into consideration.
  • First impressions are often accurate: With a number of traits you can trust your gut. But know which ones.
  • Trust mimicry and emotional expression: But they have to be sustained and consistent.
  • Awful people have tells: Pay attention to notice them. And look for narcissists in flashy clothing.
  • Deepening voice and touching says “flirting”: True for both men and women.

This Is How To Read People: 5 Secrets Backed By Research

Written by Michael DeBusk

June 26th, 2016 at 3:10 pm

Posted in Calibration,Modeling

Could it really be this simple?

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I received an e-mail today from Tom O’Connor. In it, he mentions research by Shawn Achor, a researcher of happiness. Mr. Achor says that, to be happy, we need only do the following five things every day:

  • Write down three things you’re grateful for
  • Write about one positive experience you had over the last twenty-four hours
  • Do some form of exercise
  • Meditate
  • Do one “random act of kindness” for someone else

I wonder if it’s really so simple. Let’s find out.

Written by Michael DeBusk

June 14th, 2014 at 5:38 pm

Charlie is Coming

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Charlie Badenhop. That’s who. New York City. That’s where.

If you haven’t heard of him until now, it may be because he lives in Japan. He rarely gets back to the US. I hadn’t heard of him before my friend Joel Elfman told me about some bodywork training he’d done with Charlie. Couldn’t speak highly enough of him.

This past year, I got to meet him myself. He was a guest trainer at the Master Practitioner training offered by Doug O’Brien and Jonathan Altfeld in Vermont. He was truly amazing. It’s tough to put into words.

Go experience him firsthand. Read more about it and sign up for his rare US training in Seishindo.

Written by Michael DeBusk

November 22nd, 2011 at 8:30 pm

I killed the calendar

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Back in 2008, I thought I’d try an experiment with keeping a calendar of NLP trainings.

Today, I trashed it. Consider the experiment to have failed.

Written by Michael DeBusk

September 24th, 2011 at 5:26 pm

Posted in Administrivia

RIP Quentin Grady

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I had to break some bad news to some people today, and it reminded me that I hadn’t posted it here. I think I should fix that now.

My old Internet friend, the Gentle Giant of NLP, Quentin Grady, died over a year ago, on June 7, 2010, after a long and valiant struggle with cancer.

For you who knew him, there’s nothing I can say that could inspire you to appreciate him more than you already do. You know he was an amazing man.

For those who didn’t know him… I grieve your loss as much as I do my own. You could read over 1200 of Quentin’s Usenet posts from alt.psychology.nlp if you wanted to get a feel for who and what he was.

If this is the first you’ve heard of Quentin’s death, I’m sorry to have waited so long to pass it on.

Visit Quentin’s Memorial Web site and leave a comment.

Written by Michael DeBusk

July 24th, 2011 at 2:38 pm

Posted in Articles

Tagged with

The Poor Man’s Polygraph

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Dr. Jack Schafer is a psychologist and a retired Special Agent for the FBI. He specializes in what he calls “narrative analysis,” which entails examining the other-than-conscious motivations people have for choosing a particular word or phrase in a given context. He trains peace officers and others in this skill for interviewing suspects. He’s started to teach Just Plain Folks like you and me, though, and he’s taken a blogging spot (Let Their Words Do the Talking) on Psychology Today.

Every article I’ve read there has been awesome in its usefulness. (Cops aren’t big on theory. Theory can get you shot!) What got my attention, though, was his five-part series called “The Poor Man’s Polygraph:”

  1. The Well… Technique
  2. The Land of Is
  3. Forced Response
  4. Why Should I Believe You?
  5. Parallel Lie

Short, to the point, extremely useful, easy to learn and implement. Go check it out!

Written by Michael DeBusk

January 14th, 2011 at 5:23 pm

Let’s Visit the Monkey Saloon

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My Internet buddy Adrian Reynolds has started a blog. Go visit the Monkey Saloon or subscribe in your RSS reader. He’s already got some compelling stuff up there.

Written by Michael DeBusk

January 14th, 2011 at 5:08 pm

Posted in Web sites

Letters from Santa

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Santa has a blog. It’s awesome.

Written by Michael DeBusk

December 24th, 2010 at 6:02 pm

Posted in Left Field

Locking Eyes

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A couple of weeks ago, I posted about an article I read on President Bill Clinton’s charisma and someone’s attempt to model a bit of it. I also mentioned that I’d be playing with it. I thought I’d update here.

According to the original article, there are three things Bill Clinton does that make people feel as if a “reality distortion field” has wrapped around them:

  1. Eye contact;
  2. Judicious manipulation of interpersonal space; and
  3. Focused attention.

I’m pretty good at the second one, though there are a couple of aspects of it that I could improve. It isn’t so much the actual space, but the way the other person perceives it. There are things one can do to make interpersonal space seem smaller or larger without actually moving toward or away from the other person. I think that’s an interesting idea. I’ll play with that last.

The third one? I’m horrible at it. Nearly 25 years of security and Emergency Medical Services work have required me to habitually cast my attentiveness as wide as I can. It looks like I’m easily distracted, especially in unfamiliar places. I’m really not, but there’s no way someone talking to me can tell that. I’ll play with that next.

What I’m playing with now is eye contact. I’ve always been really bad with it. When I lock eyes with someone, I get the same feeling I get when I look into someone’s living room window. Sure, if the curtains are open, you can’t help but notice it in passing, But to really look? It feels invasive to me. Like I’m violating someone’s privacy.

Irrational, I know. I’m hoping to find someone who can offer me a better way to think about what I’m doing. In the meantime, I’ve been doing it anyway. Looking into people’s eyes and keeping it.

Two things have surprised me.

The way other people respond to it is a surprise. Most of them genuinely don’t mind, and some of the rest really seem to appreciate it. Those who (apparently) feel like I do simply look away quickly, but they don’t seem offended.

Many of the first group suddenly find me a better conversationalist. Not that I say anything. They do a lot more talking to me. I guess if I appear fascinated, they must assume they’re fascinating… which does make sense. A number of people have found it difficult to go on about their business. One deliciously beautiful woman actually accused me of preventing her from leaving.

The other surprise was my own internal responses. Absolutely nothing bad has happened, and sometimes I feel surprised at that. On occasion, when I lock eyes with someone and they look away quickly, I feel a small, but primal, sense of power that I’m not at all happy about in retrospect. With many, I really am a better listener; I want to listen, I actually crave it. And the most unusual response of all: one particularly blue pair of eyes actually fascinated me… and I mean that in the original sense of the word: “to cast a spell which renders one unable to move.” I have studied hypnosis long enough to be able to break that “spell,” but for the few seconds that I was there, I went meta to it and wondered how something like that could happen to a grown man.

I learned, as well, that there are times when I need to not make or hold eye contact.

In a restaurant, for example, no matter which staff member I looked at, they stopped what they were doing and asked what they could do for me. I was actually interrupting them without meaning to. Not polite.

I spoke with the CEO of the hospital for which I work a couple of days ago, and I intentionally did not lock eyes with him. I won’t tell you the circumstances (no, I wasn’t in trouble; far from it) but somehow I felt it wasn’t appropriate at the time. He’s the type of guy that I could connect with that way if the context were different, though.

Tonight, I made eye contact with a co-worker, and I quickly broke it. I believed that if I held it, he’d ask me what the heck I was doing. I didn’t feel like explaining because I was ready to go home. You know how it is.

It’s been interesting and pleasant so far, and I think it’ll continue to be.

If you have a good, strong belief that allows you to make and hold eye contact comfortably, would you mind sharing it with me in the comments? I’d appreciate it.

Written by Michael DeBusk

December 6th, 2010 at 3:24 am